Facebook Game Gift Card, Never Ending Level, neverendinglevel.com

Facebook Game Gift Card

€15.00
  • Description

    While Facebook is mostly known for being a highly popular social media platform, a wide variety of users use Facebook exclusively for gaming. While most Facebook games are free, they require some in-app purchases to reach the top. If you’d like to surprise a fellow Facebook game lover, then getting a Facebook Game Gift Card is the perfect solution.

    Recipients can redeem the credit from this gift card and use it to purchase various items from games such as Candy Crush Saga, Farmville, Farmville 2, Farm Heroes Saga, Texas HoldEm Poker, Coin Master, and Subway Surfers, among others.

    Buying Facebook Game Gift Cars is quick and easy - it can be done in only two steps. Find a reputable Facebook gift card seller, choose the desired gift card value, and enter the recipient’s email address. They will receive the gift card which can be redeemed directly on Facebook’s website.

    They can do that by going to facebook.com/gamecards and choosing the Redeem Code option. A window will pop up and ask for the code. Once the code is entered, the gift card recipient will be able to use it as they see fit.

    This is the perfect choice for indecisive users who would like to make their fellow Facebook gamers happy. Facebook Game Gift Card is a perfect way to help your friends level up and win some more fights. They will be forever grateful.

News

Anyone can now cross-post Reels from Instagram to Facebook
Anyone can now cross-post Reels from Instagram to Facebook

Despite some missteps with Instagram , Meta is marching forward with its plan to make Reels a bigger component of its apps in an attempt to better compete with TikTok . It's rolling out several updates to Reels, particularly on Facebook's side. For one thing, everyone can now cross-post Reels from Instagram to Facebook with the tap of a button. Meta suggests that this may help creators to grow their audiences on the apps and monetize their content across both platforms.In addition, Facebook now offers a way to automatically create Reels using Stories you have already shared. The idea is to help folks create Reels with little additional effort. On top of that, Facebook has gained more Reels remix options, which Meta previously introduced to Instagram . You can now show your video after the original Reel that you're remixing in addition to having the side-by-side option.Elsewhere, the Add Yours sticker that became popular in Stories is coming to Reels on Instagram and Facebook. The idea is to nudge other users to take part in a trend. If you create your own Add Yours prompt, every Reel that uses the sticker will appear on a dedicated page. The person who created the prompt will be displayed prominently on the page as well. So, if an Add Yours trend takes off and you're behind it, that could help you to grow your audience.Meanwhile, the Facebook Stars tipping feature will soon be available to all eligible creators on the platform. Creators will also have access to more Reels insights via Creator Studio (with metrics including reach, minutes viewed and average watch time) to help them figure out what content is working for their audiences.Meta has a long way to go to catch up to TikTok, but perhaps these features will help, especially since engagement with Reels is growing across both platforms. TikTok is gobbling up almost every other social media app's lunch. A recent Pew Research report suggested that 16 percent of US teens "almost constantly" use the app, compared with 10 percent for Instagram and two percent for Facebook.


16/08/2022
NGO says Facebook failed to detect misinformation in Brazilian election ads
NGO says Facebook failed to detect misinformation in Brazilian election ads

Less than two months before Brazil’s 2022 election, a report from international NGO Global Witness found Facebook parent company Meta “appallingly” failed to detect false political ads. The organization tested Facebook’s ability to catch election-related misinformation by submitting 10 ads.Five of the advertisements featured blatantly false information about the election. For instance, some mentioned the wrong election date and methods citizens could use to cast their votes. The other five ads sought to discredit Brazil’s electoral process, including the electronic voting system the country has used since 1996. Of the 10 ads, Facebook only rejected one initially but later approved it without any further action from Global Witness.In addition to their content, the ads had other red flags Global Witness contends Meta should have caught. To start, the non-profit did not verify the account it used to submit the advertisements through the company’s ad authorizations process . “This is a safeguard that Meta has in place to prevent election interference, but we were easily able to bypass this,” Global Witness said.Additionally, the organization submitted the ads from London and Nairobi. In doing so, it did not need to use a VPN or local payment system to mask its identity. Moreover, the ads did not feature a “paid for by” disclaimer, which Meta notes all “social issue” advertisements in Brazil must include by June 22, 2022.“What’s quite clear from the results of this investigation and others is that their content moderation capabilities and the integrity systems that they deploy in order to mitigate some of the risk during election periods, it’s just not working,” Jon Lloyd, senior advisor at Global Witness, told The Associated Press .Meta did not immediately respond to Engadget’s request for comment. A Meta spokesperson told The Associated Press it has “prepared extensively” for Brazil’s upcoming election. “We’ve launched tools that promote reliable information and label election-related posts, established a direct channel for the Superior Electoral Court (Brazil’s electoral authority) to send us potentially-harmful content for review, and continue closely collaborating with Brazilian authorities and researchers,” the company said.This isn’t the first time Global Witness has found Facebook’s election safeguards wanting. Earlier this year, the non-profit conducted a similar investigation ahead of Kenya’s recent election and reached many of the same conclusions. Then, as now, Global Witness called on Meta to strengthen and increase its content moderation and integrity systems.


16/08/2022
Facebook and Instagram apps can track users via their in-app browsers
Facebook and Instagram apps can track users via their in-app browsers

If you visit a website you see on Facebook and Instagram, you've likely noticed that you're not redirected to your browser of choice but rather a custom in-app browser. It turns out that those browsers inject javascript code into each website visited, allowing parent Meta to potentially track you across websites, researcher Felix Krause has discovered. "The Instagram app injects their tracking code into every website shown, including when clicking on ads, enabling them [to] monitor all user interactions, like every button and link tapped, text selections, screenshots, as well as any form inputs, like passwords, addresses and credit card numbers," Krause said in a blog post. His research focused on the iOS versions of Facebook and Instagram. That's key because Apple allows users to opt in or out of app tracking when they first open an app, via its App Tracking Transparency (ATT) introduced in iOS 14.5. Meta has previously said that the feature was "a headwind on our business 2022... on the order of $10 billion." Meta said that the injected tracking code obeyed users preferences on ATT. "The code allows us to aggregate user data before using it for targeted advertising or measurement purposes," a spokesperson told The Guardian. "We do not add any pixels. Code is injected so that we can aggregate conversion events from pixels. For purchases made through the in-app browser, we seek user consent to save payment information for the purposes of autofill."Krause noted that Facebook isn't necessarily using the javascript injection to collect sensitive data. However, if the apps opened a users' preferred browser like Safari or Firefox, there would be no way to do a similar javascript injection on any secure site. By contrast, the approach used by the Instagram and Facebook in-app browsers "works for any website, no matter whether it's encrypted or not," he said. According to Krause's research, WhatsApp doesn't modify third-party websites in a similar way. As such, he suggests that Meta should do the same with Facebook and Instagram, or just use Safari or another browser to open links. "It's what's best for the user, and the right thing to do." For more, check out the summary of his findings here.


12/08/2022